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Giant Rock – Harbinger of Hope, Part 2

George Van Tassel has a Dream

George Van Tassel in the meantime went to work for Lockheed International, Howard Hughes, and Douglas Aircraft. After George heard about Critzer’s untimely death, he applied and obtained the mining claim at the site. The Giant Rock site became the spot for the Van Tassel family vacations.

Meanwhile Back in the Mojave

Finally, in 1947, George just up and moved the whole family – wife and three daughters – to the Giant Rock property.

Tired of the big city grind, George had a dream to build a vacation resort complete with landing strip. George had an idea that  people working in Los Angeles were also tired of the traffic and stress and would relish a vacation out in the desert. Giant Rock already had a landing strip built by Critzer. George reopened the field and built a café specializing in Mrs. Van Tassel’s wonderful pies.

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Suddenly Everything Changes

Suddenly in the 1950s, everything changed. George gave up the idea of the vacation resort. He claimed that he had been visited by extraterrestrials who instructed him to build a longevity and rejuvenation facility. George began a massive building project – the Integratron. The café was now used only as a means to finance his building. George said that the other worldly beings gave him building plans for a facility that would regenerate life and/or greatly extend one’s life span. George started holding annual UFO conferences to help finance the work and taking in donations. These conferences were held for 20 years and thousands of people attended. George also financed his work with his books including (still available online):

I Rode a Flying Saucer

The Council of Seven Lights

Into this World and Out Again

This is not to imply that everything was going great. The Van Tassels had a hard existence living out in the desert. I can only imagine what the teenage girls were thinking out in the big middle of nowhere. George must have seen or experienced something special to put his family through this. His first wife stood doggedly by his side the entire time.

Things Go South Fast
George worked tirelessly on the Integratron with only a few people helping with the construction. He never revealed the entire plans to any of the people helping him. He was actually about finished when there were some tragic occurrences. His wife, Eva, suddenly died in 1975. George then turned around and married a local chiropractor named Dorris. Dorris seized control of the operation as well as George’s financial and business affairs, much to the consternation of family and friends.

Although family claims that George was in excellent health, George then suddenly died himself of a heart attack in California at the age of 68 in 1978. He was alone with wife, Dorris, at the time promoting the Integratron to investors in California. Dorris had George cremated before even informing his daughters of their father’s death.

As if that were not bad enough, Dorris then said that their house was ransacked and all of George’s papers and building notes were stolen. The Integratron was almost completely finished by this time. Unfortunately, the core of the Integratron was also removed suddenly and secretively upon his death by unknown parties.

Conspiracy theorists claim George was too close to finishing the rejuvenation chamber which would seriously disrupt the world order as we now know it, and he was murdered by persons unknown.

Other theorists claim that Dorris was the assassin, placed solely in the area to get close to George and kill him and then get the core out of the Integratron.

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Go Visit Giant Rock

Giant Rock is available and open to the public. Be aware of the pitfalls of traveling in the desert. See below directions.

Integratron is not open to the public but sound baths are available by appointment and for groups. You can see it quite well as you drive by, however, on the way to Giant Rock. Integratron is under private ownership now.

In any event, go see Giant Rock for yourself and see what you think about it. Mull over the alien visitations and conspiracy theories. Decide for yourself what you think is true.

I have been to Giant Rock several times and it really is not all that accessible by a passenger car although one could probably make it. It is very sandy getting up to the site and quite rough. A pickup or four-wheel drive is better so that you do not tear up the bottom of your car or get stuck in sand.

Be aware that there are deadly rattle snakes in the area. It is also very hot in the summer. Take plenty of water if you go in the summer.

Directions

Travel north on Highway 247 at Yucca Valley, and take Reche Road to Belflower Road

Go left on Belflower Road until the pavement end.

You should see the Integratron on your right at that point.

Go past Integratron and turn right.

Follow the graded dirt road toward the left.

This road hugs the edge of a rock pile for about 2 miles.

Keep going until you see Giant Rock.

Enjoy!

Giant Rock – Harbinger of Hope for the 21st Century, Part 1

The Giant Rock has giant baggage! Giant Rock, located outside of Landers, California, has more old baggage associated with it than a sacred rock should have. It is a wonder the air is not filled with negative vibrations and a heavy brown aura from all the stuff that happened here. I will say that I am an Earth Empath and when I visited this sacred site, did not feel any of the sort of negative energy that was hanging onto the area.

Nonetheless, it still manages to maintain itself as a truly magical wonder of the world out there in the California desert. Located in what used to be called Homestead Valley and what is now known as Landers, it holds the title as the largest free standing boulder in the world, standing seven stories high.

Giant Rock is believed to be centered over one of the Earth’s ley lines – those energetic lines connecting all of the Earth’s sacred spots. This area is considered a high energy center and an energy vortex. People from all over the world have come to this site to check out the energy and experience its magnetic pull.

The giant granite rock was first used as a holy pilgrimage site for hundreds of years for Native Americans. This was way before American settlers ever got out this far west. The site was a sacred site for the Hopi and no doubt a favorite haunt of other desert Native Americans in the area. Medicine men and tribal shamans drew strength from the big rock. Giant Rock is believed to represent the heart of Mother Earth herself.

Giant Rock Foretells a New Era

In 2000, a historic event occurred when Giant Rock split off. An old Hopi legend said that the future of the 21st Century would be foretold at Giant Rock. The legend said that if it split in half, the Earth was doomed. If it split on the side, the Great Spirit would reconsider and reveal a new era.

In February, 2000, holy leaders gathered for a spiritual reading, restating the legend. Giant Rock had stood there for millions of years, all in one piece. But the next day after the legend restatement, a third of the rock split off from the mother rock, revealing the stark white interior. It seems a New Era had begun. Shri Naath Devi, a spiritual leader in the area, interpreted this as a positive sign that this was a sign of great spiritual awakening for the area and for Mother Earth.

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Giant Rock and its Tragic History

Prior to the 1800s, Giant Rock seems to have only been known to the Native Americans in the area and the Hopi Indians.

In 1887, Charlie Reche, a homesteader, settled there with his family. You might see “Reche Road” when you come out to see Giant Rock. Charlie was friendly to the Indians of the area. He homesteaded the entire area around and including Giant Rock, with the additional acreage where the Integratron now stands. The area was quite thinly populated with only a few residents at that time.

Frank Critzer, a German immigrant, took an interest in the area in the early 1930s and staked a mining claim in the Giant Rock area.

At some point, the Reche family left and the area came under the control of the federal government.  Critzer continued living on the claim, building a small living area underneath Giant Rock, taking advantage of natural heating and cooling insulation. He attached a radio antenna to the top of the rock to get better radio reception. Frank was a cantankerous old guy, and most people avoided him.

George Van Tassel Meets Frank Critzer

At some time in the 1930s, Critzer’s car broke down in Santa Monica, California. As fate would have it, the young George Van Tassel was working at his uncle’s shop as an auto mechanic. George’s uncles fixed Critzer’s car for free and got Critzer back on the road to Giant Rock. Critzer said that he would give them a stake in his mining claim for their kindness. Two years later, Critzer wrote George and invited to come to the area. George did visit but returned to Santa Monica.

WWII and the End of Frank Critzer

Suddenly the world was embroiled in WWII. Local folks became concerned that Critzer was a German spy. After all, he did have a lot of radio equipment! To make a long story short, the FBI did come to investigate after numerous complaints from the locals. Critzer barricaded himself in the underground bunker and when the shooting started, ended up blowing himself up with all the dynamite he stored down there from his mining operation. Or not. Conspiracy theories abound here. In any event, there was a huge fire and Frank Critzer was pronounced dead in 1942. Critzer’s underground home was burned and closed. End of Story.

Read more in our next installment of “Giant Rock, Harbinger of Hope for the 21st Century, Part 2.”